I'm Izaiah I'm 16 i live in NYC and i love skating get too know me and i follow back =P
everydaysharks:

Found this on instagram @daily_sharks 
Credit to whoever took this great photo. 

everydaysharks:

Found this on instagram @daily_sharks 

Credit to whoever took this great photo. 

Notes
867
Posted
1 week ago

marichuloca:

I fixed it ~

Remember that long time ago I had a  deep obsession with sharks? Well, it’s back.

Here are 16 species that I didn’t draw the last time ~

Obviously these are not their sizes… love sharks ♥ ♥ ♥

Notes
1336
Posted
1 week ago

thebrainscoop:

The Brain Scoop:
Sharks Sharks Sharks & More Sharks

I think it’s safe to say most people conjure up a picture of the great white when they think of sharks as a whole, which is a total shame since there are more than 440 known and described species of sharks and the diversity of those is impressive to say the least. 

There are 12 living Orders of sharks, cartilaginous fish that fall into the subclass Elasmobranchii. Some sharks have beards. Some sharks are electric. Some have poisonous skin. And they are all 100% awesome. 

Check out our last video from five consecutive calendar days dedicated to cartilaginous fishes - we hope you enjoyed the inundation of videos last week, and that our 19 minutes of programming proved to be a good alternative to sensationalism and mistruths. 

Notes
1722
Posted
1 week ago
sharkhugger:

Via Sharks Mission France
This is the english version!
Now you can speak shark, too!

sharkhugger:

Via Sharks Mission France

This is the english version!

Now you can speak shark, too!

Notes
2104
Posted
1 week ago
thesharkives:

baby port jackson
 (by MJParsons Photography)



Fast Facts: Port Jackson shark (Heterodontus portusjacksoni)
Identification: Large, blocky, pig-like head. Dorsal spines present, terminating well below tips of dorsal fins. Dorsal fins pointed. Distinct, dark bridle pattern running from upper back onto pectoral fins and along flanks. Dark stripe also runs from the cheeks over the eyes and across the supra-orbital ridges
Size: Maximum length 170cm. 23cm at birth. Males mature at 70 - 80cm, females mature at 85 - 90cm.
Habitat: Intertidal to at least 275m. Rocky reefs and sand flats from. Juveniles often in open sandy areas.
Abundance and distribution: Northern Western Australia around south coast to Northern Queensland. Most common in Southern range.
Behavior: Nocturnal. Rests during the day in groups or solitary, on the sand and forages for small fishes, Sea urchins, and benthic invertebrates at night. Juveniles form large nurseries sometimes with hundreds of sharks.

thesharkives:

baby port jackson


(by MJParsons Photography)

Fast Facts: Port Jackson shark (Heterodontus portusjacksoni)

Identification: Large, blocky, pig-like head. Dorsal spines present, terminating well below tips of dorsal fins. Dorsal fins pointed. Distinct, dark bridle pattern running from upper back onto pectoral fins and along flanks. Dark stripe also runs from the cheeks over the eyes and across the supra-orbital ridges

Size: Maximum length 170cm. 23cm at birth. Males mature at 70 - 80cm, females mature at 85 - 90cm.

Habitat: Intertidal to at least 275m. Rocky reefs and sand flats from. Juveniles often in open sandy areas.

Abundance and distribution: Northern Western Australia around south coast to Northern Queensland. Most common in Southern range.

Behavior: Nocturnal. Rests during the day in groups or solitary, on the sand and forages for small fishes, Sea urchins, and benthic invertebrates at night. Juveniles form large nurseries sometimes with hundreds of sharks.

Notes
104
Posted
1 week ago

alexandertheswell:

I LOVE SHARKS!!!!!!!!

Notes
188632
Posted
1 week ago
soul-phur:

took this photo yesterday when i was letting my quartz get some energy from the sun, isn’t it beautiful

soul-phur:

took this photo yesterday when i was letting my quartz get some energy from the sun, isn’t it beautiful

(via having-wanderlust)

Notes
304
Posted
1 week ago